Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Goddess Aite

Atë, Até or Aite is the Greek goddess of mischief, delusion, ruin, and folly. Até also refers to the action performed by the hero, usually because of hubris, that often leads to his or her death or downfall. Her parents were Zeus and Hera.


ATE was the spirit (daimona) of delusion, infatuation, blind folly, rash action and reckless impulse who led men down the path to ruin. Her power was countered by the Litai (Prayers) which followed in her wake.



QUOTE!
"And Caesar's spirit, ranging for revenge,
With Atë' by his side come hot from Hell,
Shall in these confines with a monarch's voice
Cry "Havoc!" and let slip the dogs of war, ...
Shakespeare


ENCYCLOPEDIA

ATE (Atê), according to Hesiod (Theog. 230), a daughter of Eris, and according to Homer (Il. xix. 91) of Zeus, was an ancient Greek divinity, who led both gods and men to rash and inconsiderate actions and to suffering. She once even induced Zeus, at the birth of Heracles, to take an oath by which Hera was afterwards enabled to give to Eurystheus the power which had been destined for Heracles. When Zeus discovered his rashness, he hurled Ate from Olympus and banished her for ever from the abodes of the gods. (Hom. Il. xix. 126, &c.) In the tragic writers Ate appears in a different light: she avenges evil deeds and inflicts just punishments upon the offenders and their posterity (Aeschyl. Choeph. 381), so that her character here is almost the same as that of Nemesis and Erinnys. She appears most prominent in the dramas of Aeschylus, and least in those of Euripides, with whom the idea of Dike (justice) is more fully developed. (Blünmer, Ueber Idee die des Schicksals, &c. p.64,&c.)
Source: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.

No comments:

Post a Comment